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vu-do said: are you hiring any new staff?

Without knowing what you do, hard to answer. Visit our main website for info on how to send resumes and work examples, we’ll always accept that. Thanks!

(via Ready for 2012: The Big Projects That Will Drive Downtown Forward - Los Angeles Downtown News - For Everything Downtown L.A.!: News)
Power of the Park: Perhaps the most anticipated 2012 opening in Downtown is the Grand Avenue Civic Park, a $56 million development slated to debut in the summer. The project will deliver a major facelift to the four-block stretch between Grand Avenue and Spring Street. The 12-acre park designed by Rios Clementi Hale Studios will feature terraced green space, pathways, an event lawn, new trees and a small dog run. The historic Arthur J. Will Memorial Fountain is being restored. The park could deliver the public gathering space that the heart of Downtown Los Angeles has long lacked.

(via Ready for 2012: The Big Projects That Will Drive Downtown Forward - Los Angeles Downtown News - For Everything Downtown L.A.!: News)

Power of the Park: Perhaps the most anticipated 2012 opening in Downtown is the Grand Avenue Civic Park, a $56 million development slated to debut in the summer. The project will deliver a major facelift to the four-block stretch between Grand Avenue and Spring Street. The 12-acre park designed by Rios Clementi Hale Studios will feature terraced green space, pathways, an event lawn, new trees and a small dog run. The historic Arthur J. Will Memorial Fountain is being restored. The park could deliver the public gathering space that the heart of Downtown Los Angeles has long lacked.

(via Bowl, bath and beyond | Zev Yaroslavsky)
From the post:
The design as currently proposed would include state-of-the-art sustainable features, such as waterless urinals and lightning quick Dyson hand dryers. The green theme wouldn’t end there. Green floors are being proposed as a way of bringing a suggestion of the outdoors into stylish white-black-and-stainless-steel interiors. Indirect lighting would help illuminate what are now dark and dated spaces.
There are other practical improvements envisioned as well, such as new partitions to provide greater privacy around the urinals.
“We’re trying to really increase the experience, the magic of the Hollywood Bowl” by making the restrooms “more accessible, more usable and lighter,” said Mark Rios of Rios Clementi Hale Studios, whose firm is undertaking the renovation project during the Bowl’s off-season. (The firm also designed the new Civic Center park, now under construction as part of the Grand Avenue Project.)
Julie Smith-Clementi, who is heading up the Bowl bathroom project for Rios Clementi Hale, said the idea is to keep things durable while losing the current “park restroom” ambiance. “Because it is the Bowl, it’s dressed up a little bit,” she said of the new look being developed.

(via Bowl, bath and beyond | Zev Yaroslavsky)

From the post:

The design as currently proposed would include state-of-the-art sustainable features, such as waterless urinals and lightning quick Dyson hand dryers. The green theme wouldn’t end there. Green floors are being proposed as a way of bringing a suggestion of the outdoors into stylish white-black-and-stainless-steel interiors. Indirect lighting would help illuminate what are now dark and dated spaces.

There are other practical improvements envisioned as well, such as new partitions to provide greater privacy around the urinals.

“We’re trying to really increase the experience, the magic of the Hollywood Bowl” by making the restrooms “more accessible, more usable and lighter,” said Mark Rios of Rios Clementi Hale Studios, whose firm is undertaking the renovation project during the Bowl’s off-season. (The firm also designed the new Civic Center park, now under construction as part of the Grand Avenue Project.)

Julie Smith-Clementi, who is heading up the Bowl bathroom project for Rios Clementi Hale, said the idea is to keep things durable while losing the current “park restroom” ambiance. “Because it is the Bowl, it’s dressed up a little bit,” she said of the new look being developed.

(via Paramount Pictures to Modernize Studio while Embracing Its Past | The Planning Report)
Paramount Pictures on Melrose Boulevard is the only major film studio still located in Hollywood. Within its fabled walls lies 62 acres of stages, workshops, offices, infrastructure, architecture, and open space. The studio has developed a plan for site upgrades to provide for its thousands of employees in an ever evolving industry. TPR  spoke with Paramount COO Frederick Huntsberry, with Sharon Keyser, Senior VP, Real Estate, Government & Community Relations, Paramount, and with architects Bob Hale, Principal, Rios Clementi Hale, and Brenda Levin, President and Principal, Levin & Associates Architects.

(via Paramount Pictures to Modernize Studio while Embracing Its Past | The Planning Report)

Paramount Pictures on Melrose Boulevard is the only major film studio still located in Hollywood. Within its fabled walls lies 62 acres of stages, workshops, offices, infrastructure, architecture, and open space. The studio has developed a plan for site upgrades to provide for its thousands of employees in an ever evolving industry. TPR  spoke with Paramount COO Frederick Huntsberry, with Sharon Keyser, Senior VP, Real Estate, Government & Community Relations, Paramount, and with architects Bob Hale, Principal, Rios Clementi Hale, and Brenda Levin, President and Principal, Levin & Associates Architects.

(via USC News)
The Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) granted a charter to USC Hybrid High on Dec. 6, paving the way for the school to open near the University Park campus next September.
The school, which is affiliated with the USC Rossier School of Education, will be open up to 12 hours per day, seven days per week and year-round for students who may be at risk of dropping out because they hold jobs or care for family members. Each year, one-third of students who drop out of high schools in the United States identify those stressors as key factors in their decision to leave school.
USC Hybrid High’s mission is to graduate 100 percent of its high-need students prepared for success at college or in their career and on the same tax dollar as other public schools.

(via USC News)

The Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) granted a charter to USC Hybrid High on Dec. 6, paving the way for the school to open near the University Park campus next September.

The school, which is affiliated with the USC Rossier School of Education, will be open up to 12 hours per day, seven days per week and year-round for students who may be at risk of dropping out because they hold jobs or care for family members. Each year, one-third of students who drop out of high schools in the United States identify those stressors as key factors in their decision to leave school.

USC Hybrid High’s mission is to graduate 100 percent of its high-need students prepared for success at college or in their career and on the same tax dollar as other public schools.

(via Back to Shul - LA Times Magazine)
Temple Emanuel gets a nice write-up from Mayer Rus for LA magazine. 
“This building, laden with incredible artworks and symbols, had fallen out of the daily life of the congregation,” says Rios. “Our job was to revitalize the sacred space and reengage it with the community.”

(via Back to Shul - LA Times Magazine)

Temple Emanuel gets a nice write-up from Mayer Rus for LA magazine. 

“This building, laden with incredible artworks and symbols, had fallen out of the daily life of the congregation,” says Rios. “Our job was to revitalize the sacred space and reengage it with the community.”

LAX: Airport seeks public input on northside property uses

Rios Clementi Hale Studios is working as the Urban Designer with URS on this project. 

This training ground for city gardeners would also have to be highly functional public space. How it should function for protesters, dog walkers, office workers, farmers markets and the like has been addressed by at least 10 failed plans by “some of the best urban thinkers,” said Mark Rios, landscape architect of the four-block-long, multimillion-dollar Civic Park under construction across Spring Street from City Hall. Rios hopes that Civic Park will take pressure off City Hall’s gardens to be all things to all people. (via Occupy L.A. may help get City Hall lawn on the right track - latimes.com)

This training ground for city gardeners would also have to be highly functional public space. How it should function for protesters, dog walkers, office workers, farmers markets and the like has been addressed by at least 10 failed plans by “some of the best urban thinkers,” said Mark Rios, landscape architect of the four-block-long, multimillion-dollar Civic Park under construction across Spring Street from City Hall. Rios hopes that Civic Park will take pressure off City Hall’s gardens to be all things to all people. (via Occupy L.A. may help get City Hall lawn on the right track - latimes.com)

(via Unveiled> Paramount Pictures Expansion - The Architect’s Newspaper)

On September 20 Paramount Pictures and Rios Clementi Hale unveiled a 25-year master plan detailing about $700 million in additions and improvements, including new sound stages and offices for its historic Hollywood lot, located at 5555 Melrose Avenue, across from the Hollywood Forever Cemetery. About 1.4 million square feet of development would take place over the next two decades at the studio and on adjacent properties if officials approve the project.
Currently the lot, while iconic from the street, is a disorganized, outdated collection of stages, offices, trailers and other facilities, many dating from the early 1900s. Paramount, which moved onto the property in the 1920s, had bought an adjacent studio and other properties over the years but had never made a formal move to unite or update everything until now.
To streamline operations, production and support facilities will be combined, and the project will add new post-production and production support facilities as well as new office buildings that include producer, talent, and writer offices. The project will also include more gathering spaces, like a new green space and a “post production village,” and enhanced circulation—including new pedestrian axes. Surface parking lots will be replaced with garages and some buildings may even be clad with vertical gardens.
Rios Clementi Hale partner Bob Hale stressed that in deference to the historic character of the studio, most of the lot will remain the same. “Only a handful” of existing buildings will be removed, he said, while new construction will be limited in scale. Contemporary buildings, said Hale, “will be sympathetic to the existing fabric on the one hand and contrast with it on the other.”
The studio is filing a master plan application with the city and will then begin work on the environmental review process. The process, including multiple public hearings, could take about two years.
Sam Lubell

(via Unveiled> Paramount Pictures Expansion - The Architect’s Newspaper)

On September 20 Paramount Pictures and Rios Clementi Hale unveiled a 25-year master plan detailing about $700 million in additions and improvements, including new sound stages and offices for its historic Hollywood lot, located at 5555 Melrose Avenue, across from the Hollywood Forever Cemetery. About 1.4 million square feet of development would take place over the next two decades at the studio and on adjacent properties if officials approve the project.

Currently the lot, while iconic from the street, is a disorganized, outdated collection of stages, offices, trailers and other facilities, many dating from the early 1900s. Paramount, which moved onto the property in the 1920s, had bought an adjacent studio and other properties over the years but had never made a formal move to unite or update everything until now.

To streamline operations, production and support facilities will be combined, and the project will add new post-production and production support facilities as well as new office buildings that include producer, talent, and writer offices. The project will also include more gathering spaces, like a new green space and a “post production village,” and enhanced circulation—including new pedestrian axes. Surface parking lots will be replaced with garages and some buildings may even be clad with vertical gardens.

Rios Clementi Hale partner Bob Hale stressed that in deference to the historic character of the studio, most of the lot will remain the same. “Only a handful” of existing buildings will be removed, he said, while new construction will be limited in scale. Contemporary buildings, said Hale, “will be sympathetic to the existing fabric on the one hand and contrast with it on the other.”

The studio is filing a master plan application with the city and will then begin work on the environmental review process. The process, including multiple public hearings, could take about two years.

Sam Lubell

PALM SPRINGS — Colorful sketches of a vibrant, open-air shopping center with a wide new boulevard leading to the Palm Springs Art Museum were released Thursday by the developer who plans to transform the decaying Desert Fashion Plaza downtown. Mall owner and developer John Wessman of Wessman Development unveiled the new, street-level sketches by part-time Palm Springs resident Mark Rios, marking what he called an “exciting milestone” for the project. The announcement came on the same day Wessman and city officials signed the project financing agreement, which relies on passage of Measure J in November to raise the city’s sales tax. The city is committing to spend $43 million to help pay for the transformation of the dead mall into a bustling village center, a project estimated to cost more than $100 million. “The city of Palm Springs is now one step closer to achieving a revitalized commercial core,” Mayor Steve Pougnet said in a statement. (via Downtown Palm Springs reimagined in Desert Fashion Plaza plans | The Desert Sun | MyDesert.com)

PALM SPRINGS — Colorful sketches of a vibrant, open-air shopping center with a wide new boulevard leading to the Palm Springs Art Museum were released Thursday by the developer who plans to transform the decaying Desert Fashion Plaza downtown. Mall owner and developer John Wessman of Wessman Development unveiled the new, street-level sketches by part-time Palm Springs resident Mark Rios, marking what he called an “exciting milestone” for the project. The announcement came on the same day Wessman and city officials signed the project financing agreement, which relies on passage of Measure J in November to raise the city’s sales tax. The city is committing to spend $43 million to help pay for the transformation of the dead mall into a bustling village center, a project estimated to cost more than $100 million. “The city of Palm Springs is now one step closer to achieving a revitalized commercial core,” Mayor Steve Pougnet said in a statement. (via Downtown Palm Springs reimagined in Desert Fashion Plaza plans | The Desert Sun | MyDesert.com)

History

Austin City Limits has been recording and cataloguing traditional and emerging American, international and multicultural music in a live format for over 30 years. The recordings are characterized by the intimate and light handed approach to the artist and an attention to the music and technical artistry. The primary format has been directed toward the vehicle of television coupled with the energy of a live audience. Austin City Limits has continued to improve its’ technical facility to match or exceed the capabilities of the what the television viewer has available and deliver to the live audience as technically perfect an “amplification” while not detracting from the live performance.

 Design

 The initial design concept for the venue was a simple box within a box. The lobby and the back of house functions would then fill in the space around the inner box which is the performance space. A grand stair case would connect the floors in the lobby. Driven by site lines and maximizing the capacity and versatility of the space, the performance space literally has had to break out of its inner box and leave the box shape behind. The section of the building in all directions has had to become much more complex and every residual space must be utilized.

 The building has become the embodiment of a traveling case the artists brings with them: a simple practical exterior shape, a box, in which an irregularly shaped instrument is placed with neatly packed supporting components placed around it. The lobby space is a manifestation of the performance space pushing into, shifting, and separating lobby walls on angles. In this sense, the instrument has inserted its’ shape into the lobby. Entrance into the performance space is by passing through gaps in the over-lapping walls. The grand stair is the most radically affected element from the performance space’s expansion. The stair has been forced to wrap around itself, going higher, and expressing itself through openings in the exterior of the building. These contact points have become openings in the building and the landings are revolving vantage points into the space and out into the city. 

The Sherman Oaks East Valley Adult Center accommodates a range of services addressing the needs of the senior community of the east San Fernando Valley while also creating a distinct identity for the Van Nuys/Sherman Oaks War Memorial Park and the community that surrounds it. The design and colors of the building establishes an identifiable presence along the Van Nuys Boulevard street edge, and the buildings create a gateway between the park and the city.

The building’s form draws from two different groups of local historical precedents - the area’s agricultural history and the wave of postwar modernist housing developments that populated the Valley. The overall color palette references the variety of produce grown in the area. The fuchsias, reds and oranges of the street edge infuse the facade with urban character, while on the park side, greens, yellows and blues relate to the natural character of the park.

The park pavilion’s openness helps bring light into the structure and large windows provide picture views out to the surrounding park landscape. A large mural was installed in the center as part of the City’s 1% for Public Art program.

A securable perimeter fence and low, tough plantings limit direct approach to the building from Van Nuys Boulevard. Minimal but low windows discourage vandalism.

We are pleased to note that our design enabled the Department to save over one million dollars in construction costs.

On Friday August 12th staff members from Rios Clementi Hale Studios went on a site walk of Los Angeles’s Civic Park which broke ground last August. Approximately 30 staff members donned hardhats and explored the approximately 12-acre site. The Staff was able to see their vision coming to life as they walked all three of the the four blocks of the developing park. Their walk included the fountain area, the new Starbucks building, a community stage and other spots, all of which will eventually become a unified park where LA residents can gather and celebrate.

On Friday August 12th staff members from Rios Clementi Hale Studios went on a site walk of Los Angeles’s Civic Park which broke ground last August. Approximately 30 staff members donned hardhats and explored the approximately 12-acre site. The Staff was able to see their vision coming to life as they walked all three of the the four blocks of the developing park. Their walk included the fountain area, the new Starbucks building, a community stage and other spots, all of which will eventually become a unified park where LA residents can gather and celebrate.

(via An Exhibition Imagines A Transformed L.A., in 2060 | Co. Design)
From the post:

50 years ago, a shiny, postwar Los Angeles was a model of the new American Dream. The nascent suburban plan promised single-family homes and grassy yards for all. A glossy Oldsmobile in the driveway navigated down ribbons of shimmering, empty freeways. Yet several decades later, Angelenos agree that seemingly utopian vision didn’t quite deliver. Those wide streets are now choked with traffic, acres of lawns are running low on water to keep them green, and the city’s urban culture suffers from its sprawling disconnectedness.

Los Angeles is uniquely poised to deliver a new vision of the American Dream.

But Los Angeles, as one of the world’s most prodigious producers and exporters of new ideas, is also uniquely poised to deliver a new vision of the American Dream. That’s the idea behind a new exhibition Rethink LA: Perspectives on the Future City, which opened last week at the city’s A+D Museum. Rethink LA, which is also a collective of creatives, asked L.A. residents ranging from writers to filmmakers to visualize idealistic descriptions of a sustainable, mobile Los Angeles that thrives 50 years in the future.
To create the exhibition, Rethink LA asked artists, photographers, architects, planners, and policy-makers to create visionary collages based on photos taken of current-day Los Angeles infrastructure. Contributors include multidisciplinary design firm Rios Clementi Hale, "Edible Estates" artist Fritz Haeg, and Los Angeles City Council president Eric Garcetti. In addition, nine narrators (disclosure: including myself) penned stories envisioning different aspects of L.A.’s future which were made into short films and audio narrations.
But fanciful renderings are not the only element of the exhibition. As part of its dedication to plot real-world, solution-based change, the show will also offer interactive elements and community events. This Thursday night the group hopes to bring one aspect of L.A.’s inevitable future to life by envisioning a city that’s independent of the automobile. The event, named Moving Beyond Cars, asks all attendees to arrive on bike, foot or via public transportation — and will be awarding prizes for the longest or most creative journeys.

(via An Exhibition Imagines A Transformed L.A., in 2060 | Co. Design)

From the post:

50 years ago, a shiny, postwar Los Angeles was a model of the new American Dream. The nascent suburban plan promised single-family homes and grassy yards for all. A glossy Oldsmobile in the driveway navigated down ribbons of shimmering, empty freeways. Yet several decades later, Angelenos agree that seemingly utopian vision didn’t quite deliver. Those wide streets are now choked with traffic, acres of lawns are running low on water to keep them green, and the city’s urban culture suffers from its sprawling disconnectedness.

Los Angeles is uniquely poised to deliver a new vision of the American Dream.

But Los Angeles, as one of the world’s most prodigious producers and exporters of new ideas, is also uniquely poised to deliver a new vision of the American Dream. That’s the idea behind a new exhibition Rethink LA: Perspectives on the Future City, which opened last week at the city’s A+D Museum. Rethink LA, which is also a collective of creatives, asked L.A. residents ranging from writers to filmmakers to visualize idealistic descriptions of a sustainable, mobile Los Angeles that thrives 50 years in the future.

To create the exhibition, Rethink LA asked artists, photographers, architects, planners, and policy-makers to create visionary collages based on photos taken of current-day Los Angeles infrastructure. Contributors include multidisciplinary design firm Rios Clementi Hale"Edible Estates" artist Fritz Haeg, and Los Angeles City Council president Eric Garcetti. In addition, nine narrators (disclosure: including myself) penned stories envisioning different aspects of L.A.’s future which were made into short films and audio narrations.

But fanciful renderings are not the only element of the exhibition. As part of its dedication to plot real-world, solution-based change, the show will also offer interactive elements and community events. This Thursday night the group hopes to bring one aspect of L.A.’s inevitable future to life by envisioning a city that’s independent of the automobile. The event, named Moving Beyond Cars, asks all attendees to arrive on bike, foot or via public transportation — and will be awarding prizes for the longest or most creative journeys.

vu-do said: are you hiring any new staff?

Without knowing what you do, hard to answer. Visit our main website for info on how to send resumes and work examples, we’ll always accept that. Thanks!

(via Ready for 2012: The Big Projects That Will Drive Downtown Forward - Los Angeles Downtown News - For Everything Downtown L.A.!: News)
Power of the Park: Perhaps the most anticipated 2012 opening in Downtown is the Grand Avenue Civic Park, a $56 million development slated to debut in the summer. The project will deliver a major facelift to the four-block stretch between Grand Avenue and Spring Street. The 12-acre park designed by Rios Clementi Hale Studios will feature terraced green space, pathways, an event lawn, new trees and a small dog run. The historic Arthur J. Will Memorial Fountain is being restored. The park could deliver the public gathering space that the heart of Downtown Los Angeles has long lacked.

(via Ready for 2012: The Big Projects That Will Drive Downtown Forward - Los Angeles Downtown News - For Everything Downtown L.A.!: News)

Power of the Park: Perhaps the most anticipated 2012 opening in Downtown is the Grand Avenue Civic Park, a $56 million development slated to debut in the summer. The project will deliver a major facelift to the four-block stretch between Grand Avenue and Spring Street. The 12-acre park designed by Rios Clementi Hale Studios will feature terraced green space, pathways, an event lawn, new trees and a small dog run. The historic Arthur J. Will Memorial Fountain is being restored. The park could deliver the public gathering space that the heart of Downtown Los Angeles has long lacked.

(via Bowl, bath and beyond | Zev Yaroslavsky)
From the post:
The design as currently proposed would include state-of-the-art sustainable features, such as waterless urinals and lightning quick Dyson hand dryers. The green theme wouldn’t end there. Green floors are being proposed as a way of bringing a suggestion of the outdoors into stylish white-black-and-stainless-steel interiors. Indirect lighting would help illuminate what are now dark and dated spaces.
There are other practical improvements envisioned as well, such as new partitions to provide greater privacy around the urinals.
“We’re trying to really increase the experience, the magic of the Hollywood Bowl” by making the restrooms “more accessible, more usable and lighter,” said Mark Rios of Rios Clementi Hale Studios, whose firm is undertaking the renovation project during the Bowl’s off-season. (The firm also designed the new Civic Center park, now under construction as part of the Grand Avenue Project.)
Julie Smith-Clementi, who is heading up the Bowl bathroom project for Rios Clementi Hale, said the idea is to keep things durable while losing the current “park restroom” ambiance. “Because it is the Bowl, it’s dressed up a little bit,” she said of the new look being developed.

(via Bowl, bath and beyond | Zev Yaroslavsky)

From the post:

The design as currently proposed would include state-of-the-art sustainable features, such as waterless urinals and lightning quick Dyson hand dryers. The green theme wouldn’t end there. Green floors are being proposed as a way of bringing a suggestion of the outdoors into stylish white-black-and-stainless-steel interiors. Indirect lighting would help illuminate what are now dark and dated spaces.

There are other practical improvements envisioned as well, such as new partitions to provide greater privacy around the urinals.

“We’re trying to really increase the experience, the magic of the Hollywood Bowl” by making the restrooms “more accessible, more usable and lighter,” said Mark Rios of Rios Clementi Hale Studios, whose firm is undertaking the renovation project during the Bowl’s off-season. (The firm also designed the new Civic Center park, now under construction as part of the Grand Avenue Project.)

Julie Smith-Clementi, who is heading up the Bowl bathroom project for Rios Clementi Hale, said the idea is to keep things durable while losing the current “park restroom” ambiance. “Because it is the Bowl, it’s dressed up a little bit,” she said of the new look being developed.

(via Paramount Pictures to Modernize Studio while Embracing Its Past | The Planning Report)
Paramount Pictures on Melrose Boulevard is the only major film studio still located in Hollywood. Within its fabled walls lies 62 acres of stages, workshops, offices, infrastructure, architecture, and open space. The studio has developed a plan for site upgrades to provide for its thousands of employees in an ever evolving industry. TPR  spoke with Paramount COO Frederick Huntsberry, with Sharon Keyser, Senior VP, Real Estate, Government & Community Relations, Paramount, and with architects Bob Hale, Principal, Rios Clementi Hale, and Brenda Levin, President and Principal, Levin & Associates Architects.

(via Paramount Pictures to Modernize Studio while Embracing Its Past | The Planning Report)

Paramount Pictures on Melrose Boulevard is the only major film studio still located in Hollywood. Within its fabled walls lies 62 acres of stages, workshops, offices, infrastructure, architecture, and open space. The studio has developed a plan for site upgrades to provide for its thousands of employees in an ever evolving industry. TPR  spoke with Paramount COO Frederick Huntsberry, with Sharon Keyser, Senior VP, Real Estate, Government & Community Relations, Paramount, and with architects Bob Hale, Principal, Rios Clementi Hale, and Brenda Levin, President and Principal, Levin & Associates Architects.

(via USC News)
The Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) granted a charter to USC Hybrid High on Dec. 6, paving the way for the school to open near the University Park campus next September.
The school, which is affiliated with the USC Rossier School of Education, will be open up to 12 hours per day, seven days per week and year-round for students who may be at risk of dropping out because they hold jobs or care for family members. Each year, one-third of students who drop out of high schools in the United States identify those stressors as key factors in their decision to leave school.
USC Hybrid High’s mission is to graduate 100 percent of its high-need students prepared for success at college or in their career and on the same tax dollar as other public schools.

(via USC News)

The Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) granted a charter to USC Hybrid High on Dec. 6, paving the way for the school to open near the University Park campus next September.

The school, which is affiliated with the USC Rossier School of Education, will be open up to 12 hours per day, seven days per week and year-round for students who may be at risk of dropping out because they hold jobs or care for family members. Each year, one-third of students who drop out of high schools in the United States identify those stressors as key factors in their decision to leave school.

USC Hybrid High’s mission is to graduate 100 percent of its high-need students prepared for success at college or in their career and on the same tax dollar as other public schools.

(via Back to Shul - LA Times Magazine)
Temple Emanuel gets a nice write-up from Mayer Rus for LA magazine. 
“This building, laden with incredible artworks and symbols, had fallen out of the daily life of the congregation,” says Rios. “Our job was to revitalize the sacred space and reengage it with the community.”

(via Back to Shul - LA Times Magazine)

Temple Emanuel gets a nice write-up from Mayer Rus for LA magazine. 

“This building, laden with incredible artworks and symbols, had fallen out of the daily life of the congregation,” says Rios. “Our job was to revitalize the sacred space and reengage it with the community.”

LAX: Airport seeks public input on northside property uses

Rios Clementi Hale Studios is working as the Urban Designer with URS on this project. 

This training ground for city gardeners would also have to be highly functional public space. How it should function for protesters, dog walkers, office workers, farmers markets and the like has been addressed by at least 10 failed plans by “some of the best urban thinkers,” said Mark Rios, landscape architect of the four-block-long, multimillion-dollar Civic Park under construction across Spring Street from City Hall. Rios hopes that Civic Park will take pressure off City Hall’s gardens to be all things to all people. (via Occupy L.A. may help get City Hall lawn on the right track - latimes.com)

This training ground for city gardeners would also have to be highly functional public space. How it should function for protesters, dog walkers, office workers, farmers markets and the like has been addressed by at least 10 failed plans by “some of the best urban thinkers,” said Mark Rios, landscape architect of the four-block-long, multimillion-dollar Civic Park under construction across Spring Street from City Hall. Rios hopes that Civic Park will take pressure off City Hall’s gardens to be all things to all people. (via Occupy L.A. may help get City Hall lawn on the right track - latimes.com)

(via Unveiled> Paramount Pictures Expansion - The Architect’s Newspaper)

On September 20 Paramount Pictures and Rios Clementi Hale unveiled a 25-year master plan detailing about $700 million in additions and improvements, including new sound stages and offices for its historic Hollywood lot, located at 5555 Melrose Avenue, across from the Hollywood Forever Cemetery. About 1.4 million square feet of development would take place over the next two decades at the studio and on adjacent properties if officials approve the project.
Currently the lot, while iconic from the street, is a disorganized, outdated collection of stages, offices, trailers and other facilities, many dating from the early 1900s. Paramount, which moved onto the property in the 1920s, had bought an adjacent studio and other properties over the years but had never made a formal move to unite or update everything until now.
To streamline operations, production and support facilities will be combined, and the project will add new post-production and production support facilities as well as new office buildings that include producer, talent, and writer offices. The project will also include more gathering spaces, like a new green space and a “post production village,” and enhanced circulation—including new pedestrian axes. Surface parking lots will be replaced with garages and some buildings may even be clad with vertical gardens.
Rios Clementi Hale partner Bob Hale stressed that in deference to the historic character of the studio, most of the lot will remain the same. “Only a handful” of existing buildings will be removed, he said, while new construction will be limited in scale. Contemporary buildings, said Hale, “will be sympathetic to the existing fabric on the one hand and contrast with it on the other.”
The studio is filing a master plan application with the city and will then begin work on the environmental review process. The process, including multiple public hearings, could take about two years.
Sam Lubell

(via Unveiled> Paramount Pictures Expansion - The Architect’s Newspaper)

On September 20 Paramount Pictures and Rios Clementi Hale unveiled a 25-year master plan detailing about $700 million in additions and improvements, including new sound stages and offices for its historic Hollywood lot, located at 5555 Melrose Avenue, across from the Hollywood Forever Cemetery. About 1.4 million square feet of development would take place over the next two decades at the studio and on adjacent properties if officials approve the project.

Currently the lot, while iconic from the street, is a disorganized, outdated collection of stages, offices, trailers and other facilities, many dating from the early 1900s. Paramount, which moved onto the property in the 1920s, had bought an adjacent studio and other properties over the years but had never made a formal move to unite or update everything until now.

To streamline operations, production and support facilities will be combined, and the project will add new post-production and production support facilities as well as new office buildings that include producer, talent, and writer offices. The project will also include more gathering spaces, like a new green space and a “post production village,” and enhanced circulation—including new pedestrian axes. Surface parking lots will be replaced with garages and some buildings may even be clad with vertical gardens.

Rios Clementi Hale partner Bob Hale stressed that in deference to the historic character of the studio, most of the lot will remain the same. “Only a handful” of existing buildings will be removed, he said, while new construction will be limited in scale. Contemporary buildings, said Hale, “will be sympathetic to the existing fabric on the one hand and contrast with it on the other.”

The studio is filing a master plan application with the city and will then begin work on the environmental review process. The process, including multiple public hearings, could take about two years.

Sam Lubell

PALM SPRINGS — Colorful sketches of a vibrant, open-air shopping center with a wide new boulevard leading to the Palm Springs Art Museum were released Thursday by the developer who plans to transform the decaying Desert Fashion Plaza downtown. Mall owner and developer John Wessman of Wessman Development unveiled the new, street-level sketches by part-time Palm Springs resident Mark Rios, marking what he called an “exciting milestone” for the project. The announcement came on the same day Wessman and city officials signed the project financing agreement, which relies on passage of Measure J in November to raise the city’s sales tax. The city is committing to spend $43 million to help pay for the transformation of the dead mall into a bustling village center, a project estimated to cost more than $100 million. “The city of Palm Springs is now one step closer to achieving a revitalized commercial core,” Mayor Steve Pougnet said in a statement. (via Downtown Palm Springs reimagined in Desert Fashion Plaza plans | The Desert Sun | MyDesert.com)

PALM SPRINGS — Colorful sketches of a vibrant, open-air shopping center with a wide new boulevard leading to the Palm Springs Art Museum were released Thursday by the developer who plans to transform the decaying Desert Fashion Plaza downtown. Mall owner and developer John Wessman of Wessman Development unveiled the new, street-level sketches by part-time Palm Springs resident Mark Rios, marking what he called an “exciting milestone” for the project. The announcement came on the same day Wessman and city officials signed the project financing agreement, which relies on passage of Measure J in November to raise the city’s sales tax. The city is committing to spend $43 million to help pay for the transformation of the dead mall into a bustling village center, a project estimated to cost more than $100 million. “The city of Palm Springs is now one step closer to achieving a revitalized commercial core,” Mayor Steve Pougnet said in a statement. (via Downtown Palm Springs reimagined in Desert Fashion Plaza plans | The Desert Sun | MyDesert.com)

History

Austin City Limits has been recording and cataloguing traditional and emerging American, international and multicultural music in a live format for over 30 years. The recordings are characterized by the intimate and light handed approach to the artist and an attention to the music and technical artistry. The primary format has been directed toward the vehicle of television coupled with the energy of a live audience. Austin City Limits has continued to improve its’ technical facility to match or exceed the capabilities of the what the television viewer has available and deliver to the live audience as technically perfect an “amplification” while not detracting from the live performance.

 Design

 The initial design concept for the venue was a simple box within a box. The lobby and the back of house functions would then fill in the space around the inner box which is the performance space. A grand stair case would connect the floors in the lobby. Driven by site lines and maximizing the capacity and versatility of the space, the performance space literally has had to break out of its inner box and leave the box shape behind. The section of the building in all directions has had to become much more complex and every residual space must be utilized.

 The building has become the embodiment of a traveling case the artists brings with them: a simple practical exterior shape, a box, in which an irregularly shaped instrument is placed with neatly packed supporting components placed around it. The lobby space is a manifestation of the performance space pushing into, shifting, and separating lobby walls on angles. In this sense, the instrument has inserted its’ shape into the lobby. Entrance into the performance space is by passing through gaps in the over-lapping walls. The grand stair is the most radically affected element from the performance space’s expansion. The stair has been forced to wrap around itself, going higher, and expressing itself through openings in the exterior of the building. These contact points have become openings in the building and the landings are revolving vantage points into the space and out into the city. 

The Sherman Oaks East Valley Adult Center accommodates a range of services addressing the needs of the senior community of the east San Fernando Valley while also creating a distinct identity for the Van Nuys/Sherman Oaks War Memorial Park and the community that surrounds it. The design and colors of the building establishes an identifiable presence along the Van Nuys Boulevard street edge, and the buildings create a gateway between the park and the city.

The building’s form draws from two different groups of local historical precedents - the area’s agricultural history and the wave of postwar modernist housing developments that populated the Valley. The overall color palette references the variety of produce grown in the area. The fuchsias, reds and oranges of the street edge infuse the facade with urban character, while on the park side, greens, yellows and blues relate to the natural character of the park.

The park pavilion’s openness helps bring light into the structure and large windows provide picture views out to the surrounding park landscape. A large mural was installed in the center as part of the City’s 1% for Public Art program.

A securable perimeter fence and low, tough plantings limit direct approach to the building from Van Nuys Boulevard. Minimal but low windows discourage vandalism.

We are pleased to note that our design enabled the Department to save over one million dollars in construction costs.

On Friday August 12th staff members from Rios Clementi Hale Studios went on a site walk of Los Angeles’s Civic Park which broke ground last August. Approximately 30 staff members donned hardhats and explored the approximately 12-acre site. The Staff was able to see their vision coming to life as they walked all three of the the four blocks of the developing park. Their walk included the fountain area, the new Starbucks building, a community stage and other spots, all of which will eventually become a unified park where LA residents can gather and celebrate.

On Friday August 12th staff members from Rios Clementi Hale Studios went on a site walk of Los Angeles’s Civic Park which broke ground last August. Approximately 30 staff members donned hardhats and explored the approximately 12-acre site. The Staff was able to see their vision coming to life as they walked all three of the the four blocks of the developing park. Their walk included the fountain area, the new Starbucks building, a community stage and other spots, all of which will eventually become a unified park where LA residents can gather and celebrate.

(via An Exhibition Imagines A Transformed L.A., in 2060 | Co. Design)
From the post:

50 years ago, a shiny, postwar Los Angeles was a model of the new American Dream. The nascent suburban plan promised single-family homes and grassy yards for all. A glossy Oldsmobile in the driveway navigated down ribbons of shimmering, empty freeways. Yet several decades later, Angelenos agree that seemingly utopian vision didn’t quite deliver. Those wide streets are now choked with traffic, acres of lawns are running low on water to keep them green, and the city’s urban culture suffers from its sprawling disconnectedness.

Los Angeles is uniquely poised to deliver a new vision of the American Dream.

But Los Angeles, as one of the world’s most prodigious producers and exporters of new ideas, is also uniquely poised to deliver a new vision of the American Dream. That’s the idea behind a new exhibition Rethink LA: Perspectives on the Future City, which opened last week at the city’s A+D Museum. Rethink LA, which is also a collective of creatives, asked L.A. residents ranging from writers to filmmakers to visualize idealistic descriptions of a sustainable, mobile Los Angeles that thrives 50 years in the future.
To create the exhibition, Rethink LA asked artists, photographers, architects, planners, and policy-makers to create visionary collages based on photos taken of current-day Los Angeles infrastructure. Contributors include multidisciplinary design firm Rios Clementi Hale, "Edible Estates" artist Fritz Haeg, and Los Angeles City Council president Eric Garcetti. In addition, nine narrators (disclosure: including myself) penned stories envisioning different aspects of L.A.’s future which were made into short films and audio narrations.
But fanciful renderings are not the only element of the exhibition. As part of its dedication to plot real-world, solution-based change, the show will also offer interactive elements and community events. This Thursday night the group hopes to bring one aspect of L.A.’s inevitable future to life by envisioning a city that’s independent of the automobile. The event, named Moving Beyond Cars, asks all attendees to arrive on bike, foot or via public transportation — and will be awarding prizes for the longest or most creative journeys.

(via An Exhibition Imagines A Transformed L.A., in 2060 | Co. Design)

From the post:

50 years ago, a shiny, postwar Los Angeles was a model of the new American Dream. The nascent suburban plan promised single-family homes and grassy yards for all. A glossy Oldsmobile in the driveway navigated down ribbons of shimmering, empty freeways. Yet several decades later, Angelenos agree that seemingly utopian vision didn’t quite deliver. Those wide streets are now choked with traffic, acres of lawns are running low on water to keep them green, and the city’s urban culture suffers from its sprawling disconnectedness.

Los Angeles is uniquely poised to deliver a new vision of the American Dream.

But Los Angeles, as one of the world’s most prodigious producers and exporters of new ideas, is also uniquely poised to deliver a new vision of the American Dream. That’s the idea behind a new exhibition Rethink LA: Perspectives on the Future City, which opened last week at the city’s A+D Museum. Rethink LA, which is also a collective of creatives, asked L.A. residents ranging from writers to filmmakers to visualize idealistic descriptions of a sustainable, mobile Los Angeles that thrives 50 years in the future.

To create the exhibition, Rethink LA asked artists, photographers, architects, planners, and policy-makers to create visionary collages based on photos taken of current-day Los Angeles infrastructure. Contributors include multidisciplinary design firm Rios Clementi Hale"Edible Estates" artist Fritz Haeg, and Los Angeles City Council president Eric Garcetti. In addition, nine narrators (disclosure: including myself) penned stories envisioning different aspects of L.A.’s future which were made into short films and audio narrations.

But fanciful renderings are not the only element of the exhibition. As part of its dedication to plot real-world, solution-based change, the show will also offer interactive elements and community events. This Thursday night the group hopes to bring one aspect of L.A.’s inevitable future to life by envisioning a city that’s independent of the automobile. The event, named Moving Beyond Cars, asks all attendees to arrive on bike, foot or via public transportation — and will be awarding prizes for the longest or most creative journeys.

About:

Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Urban Planning, Interior Design and Graphics. Located in Los Angeles. www.rchstudios.com 323-785-1800 Take a look at our portfolios.

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